2017

2017
Elegance vert au Printemps

Introduction:

My photo
Current: Danbury, CT, United States
Welcome! A few years ago, I discovered an application that artists employ in their works to bring cultural awareness to their audiences. Having discerned this semiotic theory that applies to literature, music, art, film, and the media, I have devoted the blog, "Theory of Iconic Realism" to explore this theory. The link to the publisher of my book is below. If you or your university would like a copy of this book for your library or if you would like to review it for a scholarly journal, please contact the Edwin Mellen Press at the link listed below. Looking forward to hearing from you!

21 October, 2016

Patriotic Sketches




I took this photo of a plaque dedicated to Sydney Swenson (Lady Morgan). 
It's located on Kildare Street, Dublin, Ireland, 
where she lived for a while in the early  19th century. 


In her book, Patriotic Sketches of Ireland (1807), Sydney Owenson observes political philosophy in the following manner:

an extension of the mind’s eye to the whole great scale of civil society, and demonstrating the close-linked dependencies of its remotest parts, affords to the benevolence of the human heart, and the comprehension of the human understanding, a social system, gratifying to the feelings of the one, and ennobling to the faculties of the other (Owenson, 33). 

Here, she illumines her reading audience with the possibilities of revolution through elevation of human consciousness. Particularly, she mentions "benevolence of the human heart." Currently, we need to focus on the strength found between each heartbeat, that electro-magnetic force that guides the human mind. As I make my decision of the right person who will be the leader of the Executive Branch of the United States and Commander in Chief of the U.S. armed forces, I will be observing which candidate has demonstrated the qualities found in the truest human heart. That person won't be perfect. No one is. However, that person will be one who is willing to uphold the U.S. Constitution and will be protective of each human heartbeat, even those who are the most vulnerable: a true patriotic servant, who is willing to be "ennobling to the faculties of the other."



11 October, 2016

Civil Revolution






From my book: 

In Sydney Owenson’s national tales, she weaves together threads of disenfranchisement and enchantment, captures the essence of the politically inspired Romantic era, in which the grand is intentionally written to be grander, where literary characterizations entwine with political forces within a civil society. The English aristocracy and the publishing community accept Owenson as a significant member of their elite societies through her writing and marriage to Sir Charles Morgan. She becomes ‘Lady Morgan’ while remaining loyal to her Irish roots as Sydney Owenson. Her loyalty to both identities serves her expressive purposes well, for she carefully coordinates these unique influences into her text by merging the English tale of aristocratic inheritance with Irish ideology. 

09 October, 2016

Thomas Paine and Revolutionary Consciousness: A Lesson for Twenty-First Century Readers

Thomas Paine differentiates between natural and civil rights of man, with the latter originating from the former. He interprets the aristocracy’s use of language as a means of establishing a sense of power. Echoing the consciousness of the eighteenth century philosopher, John Locke, Paine elucidates for his readers an emerging global consciousness in Rights of Man:


The progress of time and circumstances, which men assign to the accomplishment of great changes, is too mechanical to measure the force of the mind, and the rapidity of reflection, by which revolutions are generated:  All the old governments have received a shock from those that already appear, and which were once more improbable, and are a greater subject of wonder, than a general revolution in Europe would be now…. what we now see in the world, from the Revolutions of America and France, are a renovation of the natural order of things, a system of principles as universal as truth and existence of man, and combining moral with political happiness and national prosperity.[1]

Our politicians of the twenty-first century could do well to consider Mr. Paine's words. These fundamental beliefs authentically provide his readership with contrasting attributes of the narrow vision present in governmental hierarchy in contrast with those belonging to humanity in general. A correlation between humanity and nature formed the consciousness of revolutionary thought, which eventually fed into the elaborate (and beautiful) artistic,  musical, and literary expressions of romanticism.


It's October 9, 2016. Are we on the brink of realizing free expression, found within the core of human creativity....or are we on the brink of a constrained life experience, found in a contrived order as the result of total control of the human mind? 




[1] Quoted in Foner 536-37.

03 October, 2016

From my Operetta, Luminescence: Rhododendron (Dark Thoughts of Anne Sexton)


There exists a balance of positive and negative in life, and in my operetta, Luminescence, I address this through the spirit voice of Anne Sexton and her associated flower, Rhododendron.

                                                     Photo from the site: Summerhillgardencentre.co.uk



Rhododendron: Dark Thoughts
(from my operetta, Luminescence)

From the corner of the garden,
a fierce wind buffets 
branches of the Rhododendron.
Now enters the looming danger 
of love’s despair.

Begonia, Narcissus,
and Southernwood
all bode a feeling of lost love
in the midst of this glorious
locus amoenus.

Anne whispers: 
Rhododendron is my flower’s name,
I bring dark thoughts
into this world of fragrance.
I make the lives of my seed
and the surrounding seeds
suffer as I do.

Man has attached meaning 
to our nature, proclaiming
that we ignore
the pleas of the world
within our hearts, 
so we suffer association
with the human frailties:
egotism, ultimate ruin, evil. 

But here in this garden, I see: 
The beauty in our lives
does surround us,
even in our darkest moments,
even in those isolated
hours of despair.

© Jeanne I. Lakatos