"So we'll live, And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh at gilded butterflies." ~ William Shakespeare
Protected by Copyscape DMCA Copyright Protection

Introduction:

My photo
Current: Danbury, CT, United States
Welcome! A few years ago, I discovered an application that artists employ in their works to bring cultural awareness to their audiences. Having discerned this semiotic theory that applies to literature, music, art, film, and the media, I have devoted the blog, "Theory of Iconic Realism" to explore this theory. The link to the publisher of my book is below. If you or your university would like a copy of this book for your library or if you would like to review it for a scholarly journal, please contact the Edwin Mellen Press at the link listed below. Looking forward to hearing from you!

Announcements

I will present or have presented research on Sydney Owenson (Lady Morgan) or my semiotic theory of iconic realism at the following location(s):

April, 2022: American Conference for Irish Studies, virtual event: "It’s in the Air: James Joyce’s Demonstration of Cognitive Dissonance through Iconic Realism in His Novel, Ulysses"

October, 2021: Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT: "Sydney Owenson’s use of sociolinguistics and iconic realism to defend marginalized communities in 19th century Ireland"

March, 2021: Lenoir-Rhyne University, Hickory, North Carolina: "Sydney Owenson (Lady Morgan): A Nineteenth Century Advocate for Positive Change through Creative Vision"

October, 2019: Elms College, Chicopee, Massachusetts: "A Declaration of Independence: Dissolving Sociolinguistic Borders in the Literature of Sydney Owenson (Lady Morgan)"

05 July, 2018

Sydney Owenson (Lady Morgan): Revolutionary



Sydney Owenson sheds light on the status of the common man and woman in mid-nineteenth century Ireland and incorporates semiotic structures within her works to communicate with her readers the various discrepancies in legislation, particularly the Act of Union 1801, decades after its enactment. Although inequity in governmental legislation exists internationally, by 1825, the imbalance within the legislative structures is unacceptable to intelligent women associated with the British or the Irish aristocracy along with the increasing numbers of female writers and readers.

For example, in the preface of her essay entitled, Absenteeism, she highlights the need for both the English and the Irish to be mindful of their patriotic responsibilities:

Notwithstanding the intense interest which is felt throughout all England concerning Ireland and Irish affairs, notwithstanding the frequent debates in parliament, and more frequent pamphlets and volumes published on points of Irish politics and oeconomy, the prevailing ignorance on these subjects still operates powerfully in maintaining prejudices the most unfounded and the most fatal, and in retarding those measures of wisdom and of justice without which Ireland can never be happy; or the British Empire secure. [1]

In this statement, Owenson demonstrates commonality between the authority, England, and the respective community of Ireland, as she begins with the phrase, ‘notwithstanding the intense interest which is felt…’ Thus, she engages in the use of negative phraseology linked with passive voice to unite the divergent intentions of England and Ireland.


[1] Sydney Owenson (Lady Morgan), Absenteeism, (London: Henry Colburn, 1825) pp. ix and x. For future reference within this study, the work will be cited as Abs.

28 May, 2018

Cognitive Revolutions: Creative Revelations


Photo by me, Full Moon over Danbury

We learn to recognize aspects of our lives that create impressions, unaware of the cognitive variations that our minds and bodies interpret and reinterpret. Yet, we continue to gracefully move through our personal universes. How often have we affected others? How often have others affected us?

Revolution of thought is inclusive of awarenss within the mind, the body and their inter/intra-connections. Very simply, as we perceive and cognitively organize our environment, we slowly create the opus that is only ours to share. To consider this concept in a positive way, that opus can move humanity to a higher consciousness.

Just think! If individuals elevated their thinking to those matters that pertain only to the goodness and creative genius that dwells within, how generous we could be with each other! How marvelous this experience could be!

As we concentrate intently on our thoughts and their influences, we affect our reality, and thus, we open the possibilities of  individual connection with the Divine.

23 March, 2018

Bluebell



                        
Bluebell

The Bluebell is a flower,
symbolizing Constancy and Helpfulness.
And I see bluebells lining the path
of a kind spirit traveling through this life
in the body of a noble person.

To this spirited traveler, 
dynamic coalescing of meditation and action
form the foundation of relevance.
Steadiness, calm, and a quick smile,
follow echoes of hearty laughs and wit.

Bluebells dance at the feet 
of this gentle, jovial spirit.
A vibrant energy and fragrance,
ever present in the serenity,
constant and helpful.

© Jeanne I. Lakatos

27 February, 2018

Enough of an Artist... Thank you, Albert Einstein

When I was participating in the Poetry Bus poetry workshops, one of the members asked us to follow these directives: 
1:  Think of (or find) a sentence. 
2: Delete the second half of it. 
3: Think of as many different ways of finishing it was you can. 
4: Now, delete the first part of the sentence, leaving only a collection of "second halves". 
5: Play with these and concoct a poem out of them. You'll probably want to mess about with   the grammar, leave bits out, put bits in, etc. Feel free. 
6: Post the poem.

I used a quote from Albert Einstein after having returned from Dublin, Ireland and Reims, France. Below is the jet-lagged concoction.

Photo of my window's view in Reims, France

I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. ~ Albert Einstein

I am Enough of an Artist...

To make my way through this airport
and appreciate the artistry
in each human utterance and smile
creative impulses within,
felt without

To hear music
in the laughter of children,
the voice of God
in the knowing timbre
of an elderly sigh

To feel this train race pass French villes,
A phantasmagoria of anxious yearning
in the muted colors of graffiti 
blended with determined drops 
of spring rain

To enter a darkened hallway,
and know that the painful hole
bitten into my lip from fear
will heal, 
bleeding into fortitude

So, I taste the blended harvest
in a bowl of vegetable soup
and ready myself for another day
with cherished goodness
of a night’s rest
upon clean, white sheets.

© Jeanne I. Lakatos

23 January, 2018

Love Poem: Two Lives

This past weekend, my daughter married a wonderful man. It was a lovely wedding. Below is a poem  that I've given to friends in the past as a wedding gift. I hand-pen it exquisitely on parchment paper in either Chancery Cursive or Old English calligraphy with iconography to frame the words, and place it in a lovely frame. Ha! Surely, they've been best sellers at tag sales.  Anyway, this is dedicated to my daughter and her husband: 

I took this photo in Kilkenny, Ireland.

Two Lives
Two lives entwined
through space and time
sharing an opus 
together, 
each day to bring
a step toward the dream
of Love's harmonic embrace.

© Jeanne I. Lakatos