2018

2018
Neighhhh-borly horses! :)

Introduction:

My photo
Current: Danbury, CT, United States
Welcome! A few years ago, I discovered an application that artists employ in their works to bring cultural awareness to their audiences. Having discerned this semiotic theory that applies to literature, music, art, film, and the media, I have devoted the blog, "Theory of Iconic Realism" to explore this theory. The link to the publisher of my book is below. If you or your university would like a copy of this book for your library or if you would like to review it for a scholarly journal, please contact the Edwin Mellen Press at the link listed below. Looking forward to hearing from you!

16 November, 2018

Happy Thanksgiving!

(Photo from Google Images)

As Thanksgiving Day draws near, and we Americans reflect upon the many blessings in our lives, I extend my sincere thanks to all of you ladies and gentlemen who have visited this blog. Your kind words and gentle spirits have meant the world to me. 
God bless! ~ Dr. Jeanne Iris

28 October, 2018

"Clair de Lune" by Claude Debussy, A Deleted Segment of Walt Disney's 1940 film, "Fantasia"

Click below to view the film clip:
"Clair de Lune" by Claude Debussy, A Deleted Segment of Walt Disney's 1940 film, "Fantasia"


I came upon this beautiful interpretation of "Clair de Lune" by Claude Debussy, deleted from the final version of the Disney classic film, Fantasia. A visual and aural illustration of life's circularity, this film depicts innovation in the art of filmmaking for the time in which the artists and musicians collaborated to create this film. Below is the opening recitative from my operetta, Luminescence, an interpretation of the medieval poem, Roman de la Rose.


The moon, known as Lunula, emits a soft, silver glow onto the indigo and deep green foliage where life renews in the created shadows of the garden’s crevices. Then, she silently dismisses darkness from the fertile land. As daybreak slowly creates an elusive blush, Lunula moves aside to allow her eminence its final glow in the dawning light. Knowing that her radiance is dependent on the reflection of the sun, she illuminates this shaded, overgrown venue with degrees of grace, providing inspiration for the precious life over which her luminescence humbly drifts. 

© Jeanne I. Lakatos 

18 October, 2018

The Revolutionary Rhetoric of Sydney Owenson (Lady Morgan)



My collection of books written by Sydney Owenson (Lady Morgan)

From page 17 of my book: 
            Revolutionary philosophy of the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries provides momentum for the transformation of consciousness, circuitous pathways of innovation and circularity within societal parameters, creating awareness of cultural change, often through literary articulation. During the long eighteenth century, Sydney Owenson constructs her national tales by configuring lexical combinations of Irish, English and European colloquialisms, drawing upon the historical and philosophical perceptions of René Descartes, John Locke, and Immanuel Kant to transform her romantic tales into narratives of political inquiry. She incorporates the German philosophical influences of Johann Wolfgang Goethe, Georg Wilhelm Friedriech Hegel, and Arthur Schopenhauer, initiating innovation in forms of cultural awareness. 
            As her writing matures, her nineteenth century contemporary scientific approach to human dignity resonates with Auguste Comte’s philosophy, revealing her personal experience with societal expectations. Her voice maintains a necessary fortitude in terms of her feminine perspective, placing Irish ideology into the center of English culture at the onset of the Ascendancy, while she illustrates foresight in challenging the political stance of the United Kingdom in the early decades of the nineteenth century. 

01 October, 2018

Thomas Paine and Revolutionary Consciousness: A Lesson for Twenty-First Century Readers

Thomas Paine, Rights of Man (photos from Google images)

Thomas Paine differentiates between natural and civil rights of man, with the latter originating from the former. He interprets the aristocracy’s use of language as a means of establishing a sense of power. Echoing the consciousness of the eighteenth-century philosopher, John Locke, Paine elucidates for his readers an emerging global consciousness in Rights of Man:

The progress of time and circumstances, which men assign to the accomplishment of great changes, is too mechanical to measure the force of the mind, and the rapidity of reflection, by which revolutions are generated:  All the old governments have received a shock from those that already appear, and which were once more improbable, and are a greater subject of wonder, than a general revolution in Europe would be now…. what we now see in the world, from the Revolutions of America and France, are a renovation of the natural order of things, a system of principles as universal as truth and existence of man, and combining moral with political happiness and national prosperity.[1]

Our politicians of the twenty-first century could do well to consider Mr. Paine's words. These fundamental beliefs authentically provide his readership with contrasting attributes of the narrow vision present in governmental hierarchy in contrast with those belonging to humanity in general. A correlation between humanity and nature formed the consciousness of revolutionary thought, which eventually fed into the elaborate (and beautiful) artistic, musical, and literary expressions of romanticism.

It's October 1, 2018. Are we on the brink of realizing free expression, found within the core of human creativity....or... are we on the brink of a constrained life experience, found in a contrived order as the result of total control of the human mind? 




[1] Quoted in Foner 536-37.

24 September, 2018

The Slug: "Fortune Favours the Brave"


"Fortes fortuna iuvat!" 
(Fortune favours the brave!) 
~ Latin Proverb

Sometimes, with certain 'green-eyed (envious) slugs,' we have to take defensive action; other times, it pays simply to observe the power of Light.


The Slug
Hypocritical green-eyed slug
compulsively feeds upon
the entrails of authenticity.

Vomiting truth along its way,
its impish, soul-less self
solely thrives on
cunning insults and ineptness.

It binges on fictional fervor
slinking in slimy skin,
 blinded by its own limitations.

It lurks about for its next victim
to entice with fabricated promises,
while other small, spineless creatures
easily fall prey to its ‘virtue.’

However...

 the Truth that this slug rejects
soon takes on a life of its own,
swirling through the air with sweet fragrance,
fusing with my fortitude.

Yet still, slinking along, the slug
slowly attempts to cross my path…
I lift my elegant boot
to squish it! Squish it good!

Ah, but there's no need to squish,
for below me, I witness:
evaporating in the powerful Light,
slimy innards,
consumed
from their lack of substance. 

© Jeanne I. Lakatos

15 September, 2018

Dusk

Below, I have written a poem based on a photograph, as an example of Ekphrasis.
My photograph is of the beautiful East Lake in Danbury, Connecticut, at sunset, just before dusk. 

I took this photo of East Lake in Danbury, Connecticut.

Dusk
Indigo pond
reflects
a hopeful, graying sky
shades of peach and blue
intermingle 
with soft, fleecy clouds
framing the Peace
that harkens my heart 
dreaming
 of possibilities
Dusk.

© Jeanne I. Lakatos


21 August, 2018

Back to School (or) A New Box of Crayons

Having finished composing the course syllabus for my university students of the new academic year, many thoughts race through my head right now. Hmmm... dilemma, which one do I choose? Okay, here goes.....



Back to School 
(or) 
A New Box of Crayons

There is nothing as sweet as the waxy aroma
of a brand new 64-count box of Crayola crayons
bought especially for that first day of school.
It has the crayon sharpener right on the box!
And oh, the most marvelous feeling:
sliding the very first crayon out of its sleeve.
Periwinkle Blue! Carnation Pink! Burnt Siena!

What does it mean, this little box of crayons?
Summer is over! Those lazy, creative days sitting
under the maple tree, dreaming of 'next school year'
are etched forever as summer memories,
and those encouraging messages 
from last June now come to fruition. 
New books, new shoes, new clothes,
New hope, new friends! Old ones, too, 
but now with new stories to share. 

Early autumn, with its cool breezes, 
whisks variegated leaves that dance 
among fallen, multi-hued apples:
Nature's fresh box of crayons
tossed with a sanguine force that energizes
each step toward the school's front door.
Like the rainbow after a summer rain,
kind smiles herald enlightenment
that radiates from a Teacher's love.

© Jeanne I. Lakatos