2019

2019
A Day at the Beach

Introduction:

My photo
Current: Danbury, CT, United States
Welcome! A few years ago, I discovered an application that artists employ in their works to bring cultural awareness to their audiences. Having discerned this semiotic theory that applies to literature, music, art, film, and the media, I have devoted the blog, "Theory of Iconic Realism" to explore this theory. The link to the publisher of my book is below. If you or your university would like a copy of this book for your library or if you would like to review it for a scholarly journal, please contact the Edwin Mellen Press at the link listed below. Looking forward to hearing from you!

20 March, 2019

Ode to Skunk Cabbage

Today is the first day of Spring,  I just had to submit this little ode to one of the harbingers of Spring, the Skunk Cabbage, as an illustration of the connection between artist and nature. 

photo of skunk cabbage from Google Images
                   
Ode to Skunk Cabbage
Bursting forth from its ruddy milieu,      
it erects from its hooded spathe.
This courageous prophet boldly faces
the chilly air with unique confidence, 
guided by a mighty force.
Radiating silently, as if to say,
“Come to me, for I offer
the nourishment you need now,”
his sweetness within calls upon
the daring creature to receive its warmth.
And she responds, and she comes:
the beetle, the spider, the queen bee,
warmed by the generosity 
of Spring’s first.
Odoriferous, proud, protective,
he inspires the fragrant flora
to engender beauty.
Now, Spring has arrived
with the burgeoning
of the exceptional skunk cabbage.

© Jeanne I. Lakatos

12 March, 2019

Sydney Owenson (Lady Morgan): 19th Century Awareness of Cultural Change

           

From pages 17-18 of my book: 

    Revolutionary philosophy of the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries provides momentum for the transformation of consciousness, circuitous pathways of innovation and circularity within societal parameters, creating awareness of cultural change, often through literary articulation. 

     During the long eighteenth century, Sydney Owenson constructs her national tales by configuring lexical combinations of Irish, English and European colloquialisms, drawing upon the historical and philosophical perceptions of René Descartes, John Locke, and Immanuel Kant to transform her romantic tales into narratives of political inquiry. 


     Her voice maintains a necessary fortitude in terms of her feminine perspective, placing Irish ideology into the center of English culture at the onset of the Ascendancy, while she illustrates foresight in challenging the political stance of the United Kingdom in the early decades of the nineteenth century.


Ha' Penny Bridge, Dublin, Ireland