2018

2018
May, Mary's month

Introduction:

My photo
Current: Danbury, CT, United States
Welcome! A few years ago, I discovered an application that artists employ in their works to bring cultural awareness to their audiences. Having discerned this semiotic theory that applies to literature, music, art, film, and the media, I have devoted the blog, "Theory of Iconic Realism" to explore this theory. The link to the publisher of my book is below. If you or your university would like a copy of this book for your library or if you would like to review it for a scholarly journal, please contact the Edwin Mellen Press at the link listed below. Looking forward to hearing from you!

05 May, 2018

Dandelion Wine Recipe



2018 is shaping to be an excellent year for the dandelion crop. Below is a recipe for dandelion wine I copied from my mother's recipe box many many years ago, but I've no idea of the origin of this recipe: 

Dandelion Wine Recipe
1 quart dandelion blossoms- packed solidly
1 gallon water, boiled for 10 minutes
Add blossoms to water and cook for 10 more minutes. 
After cooking, strain off the blossoms
Add 3 1/2 lbs. sugar to juice and 2 packets of dried yeast
Add about 4 oranges whole and 5 lemons whole
Add 1/2 lb. raisons
Soak one week with raisons. 
Stir well at least once a day while soaking during the 2 weeks.

01 May, 2018

Imre Madach's "The Tragedy of Man," Revolution and Knowledge


Photo: Illustration from website: http://www.wga.hu/html/z/zichy/index.html 

In The Tragedy of Man (1860), Hungarian playwright, Imre Madach, reveals the inherent spirit within humanity to resolve differences through knowledge. This play, consisting of fifteen scenes, depicts the first couple, Adam and Eve, in paradise whereby Eve questions the validity of the Lord’s request to deprive the couple of all knowledge. In her exchange with Lucifer in Scene II, she philosophizes:
Why should he punish? For if he hath fixed
The way that he would have us follow, so
He hath ordained it, that no sinful lure
Should draw us otherwhere; why hath he set
The path athwart a giddy yawning gulf
To doom us to destruction? If, likewise,
Sin hath a place in the eternal plan,
As storm amid the days of sunlit warmth,
Who would the angry storm more guilty deem
Than the life-giving brightness of the sun? (Scene II)

After leaving the garden of Eden for tasting of the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge, Adam and Eve fall asleep in their new home and experience a number of historical events to become aware of the many ways humanity has grown into self knowledge, beginning in Egypt, where the couple learn of personal glory. Adam then longs to learn of humanity’s struggle for the good of nation, through experiences in ancient Athens, Greece. They discover hedonism in ancient Rome, Christianity in the form of knighthood of the middle ages, where he also discovers medieval fanaticism. This leads to his search for sense in the sphere of Johannes Kepler. However, in the world of Emperor Rudolph, Adam moves on to the French Revolution, where he encounters the deceit of Danton and the ultimate failure in humankind’s ability to execute a lasting revolution. He becomes disenchanted with humanity at the London Fair. In the final scene, Eve tells Adam of the upcoming birth of their second child. She foreshadows:

If God so will, a second shall be born
In sorrow, who shall wash them both away
And bring upon this wide world, brotherhood.

Well, we all know what happened with that relationship, so Imre Madach, who places the burden of man’s struggle at the hands of the woman, also illustrates that humanity has within its grasp the ability to seize control over its destiny as the heavenly choir of angels sings:

…Yet in the glory of thy road,
Let not the thought thee blind
That what thou dost in praise of God
Is wrought of human mind.
Think not the Lord hath need of thee
His purpose to fulfill,
And thou receivest from Him grace,
If thou mayest work His will.

The Lord responds: O Man, strive on, strive on, have faith; and trust! (Scene XV)

Therefore, Imre Madach reveals, through the artistry of his writing, his intense belief that within its own consciousness, humanity has the ability to advance harmonic relevance from dissonant experience, for he presents Eve as the mother of humanity with the conviction that her children will move humanity forward in their quest for true knowledge. (Lakatos 2007)

09 April, 2018

Fiddlehead Feast

Here is a poem that I revised a bit on fiddlehead ferns, another group of plants that are harbingers of Spring. I included a recipe for Fiddlehead Quiche below the poem. Bon appetit!



photo from the front garden at my home

Fiddlehead Feast
Did you happen upon the fiddlehead fern
growing in the woodland mulch,
amidst the other springing buds
like skunk cabbage, crocus and such,
unfurling its primitive merit
with vitality richly designed?

Relentlessly, I search for the fiddlehead fern;
its presence seen, not much,
but then it boldly appears to me,
and I honorably prepare it to touch
my awaiting, salivating palate
that accepts its flavor divine!

What blissful company with which to dine:
this fiddlehead fern ~ a collation so fine!


 © Jeanne I. Lakatos  


YANKEE FIDDLEHEAD PIE (OR QUICHE)

Recipe by L.L. Bean Book of New England Cookery:
Serving Size : 8  

  4 Eggs
  1 c  Milk
  1 c  Fiddleheads, cooked, chopped
  2 Tbs Leeks -- chopped, cooked
  1 Tbs  Parsley, chopped -- or 2
  1 c  Cheddar cheese, mildly shredded
  Salt to taste
  1 Pie crust, partially baked, 9  or 10"
  8 Whole cooked fiddleheads

Beat the eggs with the milk until blended.  Fold in the chopped fiddleheads, leeks, and parsley, and half of the grated cheese. Season with salt to taste. Turn into the partially baked shell and sprinkle on the remaining cheese. Decorate the edge with whole fiddleheads.  Bake in a preheated 350 º oven for 40 minutes, or until set.  Let rest 10 minutes before serving.

27 March, 2018

Easter: Renewal

Pysanky eggs that I hand-painted... Whew! a tedious, but rewarding process.

Easter Tridiuum (Holy Thursday, Good Friday, Easter Sunday)

A Joyous Easter to You!


I took this photograph of a flower growing in the sidewalk on NUI campus, Galway, Ireland.

 Revolution

Awakened
moments conceived 
meiosis of human spirit
evolve 
into a vision of rebellion 
split
open a festering wound
bleed 
to hasten the quickening 
toward conscientious
 Awakening.

         © Jeanne I. Lakatos

23 March, 2018

Bluebell



                        
Bluebell

The Bluebell is a flower,
symbolizing Constancy and Helpfulness.
And I see bluebells lining the path
of a kind spirit traveling through this life
in the body of a noble person.

To this spirited traveler, 
dynamic coalescing of meditation and action
form the foundation of relevance.
Steadiness, calm, and a quick smile,
follow echoes of hearty laughs and wit.

Bluebells dance at the feet 
of this gentle, jovial spirit.
A vibrant energy and fragrance,
ever present in the serenity,
constant and helpful.

© Jeanne I. Lakatos

22 March, 2018

God's Peace



In this era of turbulence, it's time to sail away from the chaos. I choose peace... Peace with God. 
From this point, I am confident that He will move my heart in the direction of Infinite Love. Join me? 

May the Almighty's eternal Blessings be with you all.  

20 March, 2018

Ode to Skunk Cabbage

Today is the first day of Spring,  I just had to submit this little ode to one of the harbingers of Spring, the Skunk Cabbage, as an illustration of the connection between artist and nature. Unfortunately, we're expecting a fourth Nor'easter by Wednesday...5-9 inches of snow and blustery conditions. Oh well....soon it will be Spring...

photo of skunk cabbage from Google Images
                   
Ode to Skunk Cabbage
Bursting forth from its ruddy milieu,      
it erects from its hooded spathe.
This courageous prophet boldly faces
the chilly air with unique confidence, 
guided by a mighty force.
Radiating silently, as if to say,
“Come to me, for I offer
the nourishment you need now,”
his sweetness within calls upon
the daring creature to receive its warmth.
And she responds, and she comes:
the beetle, the spider, the queen bee,
warmed by the generosity 
of Spring’s first.
Odoriferous, proud, protective,
he inspires the fragrant flora
to engender beauty.
Now, Spring has arrived
with the burgeoning
of the exceptional skunk cabbage.

© Jeanne I. Lakatos